Just for Fun

There’s only one word that can be placed in any of the ten positions in this sentence to produce ten sentences of different meaning. (1) I (2) helped (3) my (4) dog (5) carry (6) my (7) husband’s (8) slippers (9) yesterday (10). What is that one word?

Gloria J.
Salt Lake City, Utah

The word is “only,” which makes the following sentences:

Only I helped my dog carry my husband’s slippers yesterday. (Usually the cat helps, too, but she was busy with a mouse.)

I only helped my dog carry my husband’s slippers yesterday. (The dog wanted me to carry them all by myself, but I refused.)

I helped only my dog carry my husband’s slippers yesterday. (I was too busy to help my neighbor’s dog when he carried them.)

I helped my only dog carry my husband’s slippers yesterday. (I considered getting another dog, but the cat disapproved.)

I helped my dog only carry my husband’s slippers yesterday. (I didn’t help the dog eat them; I usually let the cat do that.)

I helped my dog carry only my husband’s slippers yesterday. (My dog and I didn’t have time to help my neighbor’s husband.)

I helped my dog carry my only husband’s slippers yesterday. (I considered getting another husband, but one is enough.)

I helped my dog carry my husband’s only slippers yesterday. (My husband had two pairs of slippers, but the cat ate one pair.)

I helped my dog carry my husband’s slippers only yesterday. (And now the dog wants help again; I wish he’d ask the cat.)

I helped my dog carry my husband’s slippers yesterday only. (And believe me, once was enough–they tasted terrible.)